Congrats to AWS acquisition


#1

I would like to use the recent news of c9 being acquired by Amazon (see blog post) to thank the entire c9 team! You have build a great product. Thank you!

Pretty excited by the acquisition and I’m looking forward to a deep AWS integration.

Again, thank you and cheers!


#2

I’d agree that c9 is a great product; truly awesome. I just hope that the acquisition does not affect the ability to use c9 for low-level / non-commercial / hobby development for free.


#3

I guess C9 will function as it was functioning now


#4

Great News!:birthday:


#5

This is interesting as I thought C9 used google cloud. How will moving it to AWS improve or hurt performance?

Interesting indeed.


#6

First off congratulations on being aquired by Amazon Web Services,

I must admit I’m a bit concerned as a long time customer of your editor.

When the time comes to update to AWS IDE or whatever it is called could you consider the following.

  1. Most of your current customers expect a managed VM IDE. If we have to pay for a virtual machine + the IDE then I can see the service not been viable.

  2. Ensure that the IDE can be accessed by others too, the one that I love about Cloud9 is it’s ability to allow anyone to colab on a project even if they are not holding a C9 account. 3rd party intergration would be sweet.

  3. If AWS decides to pull the plug on C9 be sure to give customers a fair warning before the project sunsets so they can export data off of the service.

  4. Contiune to ask Amazon to improve there hardware to Google’s standards. I know the business only recently switched o ver to GCE and it would be a shame to lose the same quality we have had with Google’s cloud service when it comes to network preformance.

  5. Contiune to support C9 Core, This is important Amazon as if you want developers to publish plugins on the platform you will need support from the community to do this.

Finally I wish you all the best of luck on your next journey.


#7

Oh no! This is horrible news. Amazon is horrible at tech. Great at squeezing profit out of people but horrible at tech. Look at how crappy their website is. Look at how awkward their personal cloud is. Look and how bad the Amazon Fire sucks. The amazon app market literally crashed repeatedly for over 80%of it’s users for years before it was fixed and it still sucks.

There’s no way they are going to not screw up C9. I’ll try and keep an open mind and keep using it until they start screwing it up. But once they do, I’m just going to jump ship instead of wait and hope it’ll get better. Good thing I’ve already got several other choices to choose from!

I bet one of the first changes that comes from amazon will be changing the pricing model away from predictable monthly subscriptions and base it on something hard to verify like "processing cycles or something.

you don’t think they’ll start buying up other online IDE’s and shutting them down so we don’t have a choice ut to use there’s do you? Oh, God, they probably will.


#8

Texxs, Have you looked at aws.amazon.com. They are the leaders in cloud technology and the most used cloud vendor in the world. The Amazon Fire is a different department and so is the personal cloud. There enterprise and business offerings are much more robust. If you take alook at there enterprise applications such as Workspaces they are priced on a simple monthly subscription model.


#9

Of course I’ve used AWS. They screwed it all up didn’t they? Sure they are they leader, but they were for a long period of time the only ones who did it with a big brand name backing them.

Like I said Amazon is great at business and making sales, crappy at making tech, and all those different departments serve the same head. And that head doesn’t care about getting things done right, like I do, that head prioritizes things like dominating the market, killing competition, squeezing every penny out of consumers that it can and top level business objectives that Amazon has shown to prefer in the past.

I sure hope I’m wrong though. and like I said, I’ll be staying here until they start making these kinda changes.


#10

Agreed very good points.


#11

Absolutely spot on concern. i took a Free Tier tour of AWS and was shell shocked at the constant nickel and dime confusing (no doubt on a strategy) pricing structure. Each time I set out to create a simple mongoDB or Nodejs app I spent the whole time stuck in adding storage, security, VMs, VPs, firewalls each with an additional cost. I even ended up being charged $2 for the so called Free Tier. Yep free is not free in Amazon’s mind. So I cut the account as soon as I could. I don’t trust the AWS people. I’ve purchased ebooks from Amazon OK but these AWS people are snake oil salesmen.


#12

I am considering upgrading to the $20 plan after a number of months on the free plan. I’ve been to Azure, AWS and am still evaluating Google Platform. The trouble with Azure, AWS and Google Cloud for a Developer just learning and looking for a place to showcase code is that not only are you charged for VMs, Database Engines, VPs, Storage, Security, Firewalls, IDEs but you have to be an Architect, Network Administrator, Server Administrator and DBA before you can develop and implement a ‘Hello World’ application. Its more than most Developers need or can afford.

I Just hope that AWS did not purchase Cloud 9 to dissolve it as a separate entity. I hope if anything they simply add it as a service for development. I see that Google Cloud has an experimental IDE that uses another company that allows source code to be stored and used with this IDE. It’s very close to Cloud 9 in that sense and it includes a Shell window like the Terminal Window for CLI commands ie starting up the server.

I will only consider a flat fee for a premium service I don’t plan on using any other of the previously mentioned cloud services including AWS unless a client or business partner is paying for it. You can’t possibly afford it as a freelancer otherwise. I can afford the $20 for the premium and expect to have a half dozen or so constantly running web apps and APIs in MEAN stack to show to prospective clients wanting to hire me for contracts. That’s all i got to spend folks.

Yes I am perplexed by the combination of support now. You can deploy to Azure a competitor of AWS. How does that work? I recently saw that Google Cloud is also a valid remote repository also a competitor of AWS. Where is that going? Support for the Google Cloud App Engine. Why that one when the Cloud 9 IDE is built on Ubuntu 14 with the Google Compute Engine? By the way I’m waiting on Google Cloud to actually delete projects so I can test the Compute Engine with Ubuntu 14 but these cloud services take forever to delete resources when it is not in their interest to do so (precisely when you figured out you don’t need something they want you to pay them for).

I’ll go ahead with the premium purchases so long as its a month to month for a flat fee but as soon as Amazon starts doing the support and alters the pricing scheme I’m out.